Kindle Revisited

My exclusive 90-day deal with Kindle Prime for Time for Your Life will soon be up and I thought now might be a good time for a bit of reflection.

The original idea for Time for Your Life was to start to build up a library of articles and e-books on my business website http://www.thecoachingcorner.co.uk to support my coaching activities. I never expected to sell many copies – just as well really as it turns out.

The book garnered 3×5* reviews on UK Amazon and 1×5* on Amazon.com (Thank you Gwen Bristol) but I have sold very few copies through Kindle. On the other hand I have negotiated three-year licence agreements with a couple of companies for it to be available to the staff via the company intranets. This alone has more than covered my costs and will keep me in jelly beans for a good few months. Both those agreements came about because I sent free PDF copies to Human Resource Directors and two of them got in touch with me. The next step is for it to be available as a PDF via an on-line training and personal deveopment resource website: http://www.glasstap.com. This will expose the book to a completely different market.

I also had some picture postacards printed with the front cover of the book on one side and message/address space on the other. These I sent out to my past and present individual coaching clients. As far as I know none of those has resulted in any Kindle sales but I have sold PDFs.

So what have I learned?

1. Publishing an e-book takes very little time if you have the tech skills or the right people behind you. However marketing an e-book and getting sales takes a very great deal of time. I haven’t put nearly enough time into marketing. I had a marketing plan but seriously underestimated what time it would need – particularly finding, getting and keeping active on different book forums, blogs etc.

2. Pricing an ebook is a bit of a thorny question for me. I didn’t do enough homework on prices and so, in comparison with other books that appear to be of similar content, Time for Your Life may look pricey. £6.00 as opposed to the £1.99ers. Perception is all here. I have a view that if something is offered for sale at what seems to be a very low price then I have very low expectations of it and am more likely to pass on it. I also hold to the belief that you can always lower a price but if you start low and then try to go up in price, you pretty soon piss off a section of your customer base.Maybe I need to review these beliefs…I’m not sure.

3. I’ve mentioned this in other posts but for non-fiction it still may be better to bite the bullet and go for hardcopy publishing. I’ve been asked so many times for a hard copy or “proper” book as many have called it. I think this is an issue of disposable v for keeps.

4. I’m not totally convinced of any advantage Kindle Prime offers for this type of book other than the % rate. With hindsight I would have preferred to have offered the book from the get-go in as many ways/formats as possible.

So just something to chew on this Friday morning. I’d be more than happy to hear your thoughts/experiences – perhaps between us we should put an ebook out on the definitive way to self-publish.

Anyhoo – signing off for the weekend which is predicted to be warm and sunny – so have a good one.

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6 thoughts on “Kindle Revisited

  1. Is CreateSpace an option for UK authors? It’s a division of Amazon, and makes doing a Print On Demand version of an e-book very simple.

    My own experience with Barnes & Nobel is that it’s not worth listing on them–I was on their site for six months and never made a single Nook sale.

    For your book, though, I suspect getting into the Apple iStore would be good–a lot of people use Apple products for business.

  2. I was wondering about the Kindle Prime program. The idea of limiting myself to one format didn’t sit well with me as a first-time author. Glad to hear/read someone voicing my concerns. Thanks for your insight and experience.

      • Thanks for visiting. Coincidentally me and a pal are doing the same! I don’t really think ebooks lend themselves to photos – think how small they might be on a Kindle screen? So I’m looking at more conventional publishing. I’m told that photos really boost up costs particularly if you want them inserting in specific pages – that’s why many text/photo books have blocks of photos together with page ref. numbers. This is still something I@m researching but I’ll certainly keep you clued in. One guy I can recommend if you want to chat to a small publisher is Steve Truelove at http://www.writegoodbooks.co.uk. He’s a mine of info about the publishing biz and put my book out there for me. He’s always willing to talk through projects and their options.

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